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Suspect arrested with parts and ammo for multiple ‘ghost guns’


Numerous gun parts and accessories that could be used to make so-called ghost guns were confiscated this week after police arrested a Boston man and searched his property. Edmilson Andrade, 32, of Dorchester, was arrested Monday at 286 Columbia Road, the Boston Police Department said in a statement. He was the subject of a search warrant, officers said. “While executing the warrant, officers were able to arrest Andrade as he entered his motor vehicle. Officers were then able to peacefully enter the target address,” police wrote. Investigators recovered a long list of gun parts, including 19 plastic lower pistol receivers and four lower rifle receivers; two large capacity magazines; slides for various firearms; many small gun parts; and hundreds of bullet cartridges of different sizes. Manufacturing tools, including a 3D printer and three molds for a lower receiver, were also recovered. “This inventory is exactly the type of traffic that can devastate our streets and lead to bloodshed and horrific tragedy,” Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden said. sold on the street. Additionally, police said they found approximately three grams of white powder and strips of suboxone during the search of Andrade’s home. Andrade is charged in Dorchester District Court with trafficking fentanyl, unlawful possession of ammunition and possession of ammunition. They are called ghost guns because there is no record of their existence with the police or any government agency. They are built from parts or kits, often shipped to the buyer 80% built. The buyer does the final 20%, a job that can usually be done with ordinary household tools, no special knowledge required, to create a working firearm. With a little experience, a Glock style handgun can be made in half an hour. Massachusetts’ relatively strict gun laws do not apply to the kits because they are not considered firearms by the state or federal government. Once they are built, the law requires that they be registered with the state. But for people willing to break the law to get a gun, it’s a relatively easy way to get one. A phantom gun was one of the weapons found at a Boston high school last week.

Numerous gun parts and accessories that could be used to make so-called ghost guns were confiscated this week after police arrested a Boston man and searched his property.

Edmilson Andrade, 32, of Dorchester, was arrested Monday at 286 Columbia Road, the Boston Police Department said in a statement. He was the subject of a search warrant, officers said.

“While executing the warrant, officers were able to arrest Andrade as he entered his motor vehicle. Officers were then able to peacefully enter the target address,” police wrote.

Investigators recovered a long list of gun parts, including 19 plastic lower pistol receivers and four lower rifle receivers; two large capacity magazines; slides for various firearms; many small gun parts; and hundreds of bullet cartridges of different sizes. Manufacturing tools, including a 3D printer and three molds for a lower receiver, were also recovered.

“This inventory is exactly the type of traffic that can devastate our streets and lead to bloodshed and horrific tragedy,” Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden said.

The DA called it a “ghost gun factory” and said the guns were made to be sold on the streets.

Additionally, police said they found approximately three grams of white powder and strips of suboxone when searching Andrade.

Andrade is charged in Dorchester District Court with trafficking fentanyl, unlawful possession of ammunition and possession of ammunition.

They are called ghost guns because there is no record of their existence with the police or any government agency. They are built from parts or kits, often shipped to the buyer 80% built.

The buyer does the last 20%, a job that can usually be done with ordinary household tools, no special knowledge required, to create a working firearm. With a little experience, a Glock style handgun can be made in half an hour.

Massachusetts’ relatively strict gun laws do not apply to the kits because they are not considered firearms by the state or federal government. Once they are built, the law requires that they be registered with the state. But for people willing to break the law to get a gun, it’s a relatively easy way to get one.

A ghost gun was one of the weapons found inside a Boston high school last week.

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