Susan Collins and Thom Tillis confident on gay marriage bill after midterm


Republican Senators Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Susan Collins of Maine are confident a vote on a bill codifying protections for same-sex marriages will pass after November’s midterm elections.

“This is clearly I think a situation we want our members to feel comfortable in and I’m confident we’ll eventually pull it off,” Tillis said, according to a tweet. Posted by CBS News Congressman Reporter Jack Tourman.

The Respect for Marriage Act is a law that a bipartisan group of senators is trying to pass so that federal protections can be offered for same-sex marriages. The House voted to pass the bipartisan legislation in July with 47 Republicans voting in favor with all Democrats. However, 157 Republicans voted against the measure, while seven Republicans withheld their votes completely.

Echoing his remarks, Collins said the members are in “very good shape” and reassured that “this bill is going to pass”. according to Fox News Capitol Hill producer Jason Donner.

Above, a person waves a rainbow flag during Pride Month celebrations on June 25, 2022 in Raleigh, North Carolina. Republican Senators Thom Tillis of North Carolina and Susan Collins of Maine are confident a vote on a bill codifying protections for same-sex marriages will pass after November’s midterm elections.
Photo by ALLISON JOYCE/AFP via Getty Images

Senate negotiators announced Thursday that the vote on the bill would be delayed in a bid to increase their chances of success as GOP support for the bill remains uncertain, according to The Washington Post.

Collins and Sen. Tammy Baldwin, a Democrat from Wisconsin, are currently trying to enlist the support of 10 Republicans for the bill by reaching agreements on potential adjustments that would protect religious freedom.

“I’m still very confident the bill will pass, but we’ll pick it up later, after the election,” Baldwin said Thursday.

The legislation was originally proposed after the Supreme Court overturned Roe vs. Wade in June, ending federal abortion rights amid growing fears that same-sex marriage could be the next target.

When the landmark 1973 ruling was overturned, Conservative Justice Clarence Thomas said the Court should reconsider all “substantive due process precedents”. This includes the Court’s decision in Oberfell v. Hodges in 2015 that legalized same-sex marriages nationwide.

Republican Senator Ted Cruz agreed with Thomas’s remarks, saying in July that the Court was “clearly wrong” to rule on legalizing same-sex marriage.

The senator spoke of the “vulnerability” of the Oberefell decision in a video uploaded to YouTube in July from his Verdict with Ted Cruz podcast.

OberefellAs Roe vs. Wade, ignored two centuries of our nation’s history,” Cruz said at the time. “Marriage has always been a matter that has been left to the states. We’ve seen states before Oberefell– some states were about to allow same-sex marriage, others were about to allow civil partnerships. There were different standards that states adopted. »

“This ruling was clearly wrong when it was made,” the senator said, adding that the court was “going too far.”

Cruz touted a similar remark about the Respect for Marriage Act when he shared a tweet last week that called the bill a threat.

Bob Vander Plaats, president and CEO of The Family Leader, a conservative organization promoting “Christ-like” leadership and values, tweeted that passing the bill will threaten religious freedom.

“No matter how @GOPSenate turns the tail of their vote for the #DisrespectMarriage Act, its passage will threaten #ReligiousLiberty for generations. And, their yes vote will be a complete betrayal of the party’s platform and base.” , he wrote.

Newsweek contacted the Republican National Committee for comment.



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