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Police in Uvalde, Texas held ‘Active Fire Scenario Training’ in March and held a session called ‘Stop the Dying’


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The Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Department held “active shooter scenario training” in March, just two months before the mass shooting at Robb Elementary School on Tuesday that left 19 children and children dead. two adults.

“Active Shooter for School-Based Law Enforcement” was the training held by the School District Police Department on March 21, which “peace officers, school resource officers, and campus security officers” were encouraged to attend. to participate.

The training was held at Uvalde Secondary School and covered topics such as “Stop the Killing – Solo Response to Active Shooting Events”, “Stop the Death: Transition to First Aid and Evacuation of wounded”, as well as an “active shooter training and scenario evaluation.”

Footage from the training posted on the School District Police Department’s Facebook page shows the officers acting out different scenarios that would be encountered during an active shooter situation. A photo from the drill shows officers in the hallway as individuals lie on the ground pretending to be dead or injured.

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“Active Shooter for School-Based Law Enforcement” was the training organized by the School District Police Department on March 21, and “peace officers, school resource officers, and campus security officers” were encouraged to attend it.
(Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Department)

“On Monday, the UCISD Police Department conducted ‘Active Shooter Training’ at Uvalde High School. Our overall goal is to train every law enforcement officer in the Uvalde area so that we can Prepare ourselves as best we can for any situation that may arise,” the police department said in a Facebook post.

The training was mandated by Texas House Bill 2195, which states that school resource officers must undergo training in active shooter situations.

According to a course guide for the active shooter training program, one of the objectives states that “the student will be able to compare/contrast an active shooter event and a hostage or barricade crisis.”

“A simple barricade crisis develops when one or more armed actors isolate themselves with little or no ability to harm other innocent people. Barricaded subjects pose the greatest threat when attempts are made to enter the space and master them”, continues the course guide. State.

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At a press conference Friday, Texas Department of Public Safety Director Steven McCraw said the commander on scene at Robb Elementary School during the mass shooting “was convinced at the time that ‘there was no longer a threat to the children,’ adding that he believed the situation was going from active shooter to barricaded subject.

“The on-scene commander considered a barricaded subject and that there was time and there were no children at risk. Obviously, you know, based on the information we have, there was kids in that class who were at risk, and it was, in fact, still an active shooter situation and not a barricaded subject,” McCraw said.

The school resource officer training course manual, which was organized by the Uvalde Consolidated Independent School District Police Department, references the 2018 school shooting in Parkland, Florida, stating that “video footage of an officer ‘acting’ outside the building as the Parkland attack unfolded drew much public criticism.”

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The officers who responded to the incident are facing heavy criticism over their handling of the incident as new evidence comes to light.

” Go for it ! Enter it! ” A woman shouted at the policeaccording to Juan Carranza, 24.

Javier Cazares drove to the school after learning of the shooting as his daughter was attending school there and said the officers were staying outside.

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Police in Uvalde, Texas held ‘Active Fire Scenario Training’ in March and held a session called ‘Stop the Dying’

A member of law enforcement lights a candle outside Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on Wednesday, May 25, 2022. Desperation has turned into heartbreaking grief for families of elementary school students killed after an 18-year-old gunman barricaded himself in their classroom in Texas and began shooting, killing several fourth-graders and their teachers.
(AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

His daughter, Jacklyn Cazares, died in the shooting.

Cazares at one point suggested that a group of people “rush in because the cops aren’t doing anything like they’re supposed to. More could have been done. They weren’t prepared.”

Fox News’ Brie Stimson contributed to this report.

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