NASA’s Webb Telescope ‘first light’ images almost bring astronomers to tears


NEWYou can now listen to Fox News articles!

Nearly six months after the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope, astronomers began receiving images from the mighty telescope, showing the outer reaches of the universe.

NASA won’t share some of these images with the public until July 12, but astronomers have given us a glimpse of what to expect.

The James Webb Space Telescope seen on March 5, 2020.
(NASA/Chris Gunn)

NASA Deputy Administrator Pam Melroy said the “first light” images “moved me, as a scientist, as an engineer, and as a human being.” “First light” generally refers to the first time a telescope is used for scientific observation after it has undergone testing and calibration.

Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA’s science programs manager, told a news conference on Wednesday that he was almost moved to tears by the images.

NASA WILL USE INFORMATION FROM NEW ZEALAND LAUNCH TO PAVE PATH FOR MOON LANDING

“It’s really hard not to look at the universe in a new light and just have a deeply personal moment,” he said. “It’s a moving moment when you see nature suddenly revealing some of its secrets. And I would like you to imagine and look forward to that.”

The European Space Agency’s Ariane 5 rocket launched the James Webb Space Telescope into space on Christmas Day 2021. In the months that followed, the telescope – considered the most powerful in the world – opened its shield sun and traveled almost a million kilometers from Earth.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

As the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, the Webb took nearly two decades to design, build and test before launch.


Fox Gt

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.
Back to top button