Livestock death toll rises to 3,000 in Rajasthan, Gujarat


By CNBCTV18.com IST (Released)

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In Rajasthan, more than nine districts have been affected by the virus disease including Jalore, Jodhpur, Barmer, Ganganagar, Nagaur, Bikaner, Jaisalmer Pali and Siorhi. In Gujarat, 14 districts have been affected including all districts of Saurashtra, Kutch and Banaskantha region

The death toll among cattle in Rajasthan and Gujarat has risen to nearly 3,000 in recent weeks due to a viral infection known as lumpy skin disease (LSD).

In Rajasthan, more than nine districts have been affected by the virus disease including Jalore, Jodhpur, Barmer, Ganganagar, Nagaur, Bikaner, Jaisalmer Pali and Sirohi.

In Gujarat, 14 districts were affected, including all districts in Saurashtra, Kutch and Banaskantha region. On August 3, Gujarat Chief Minister Bhupendra Patel visited the affected areas in Kutch and reviewed the situation. According to Kutch district development officer Bhavya Verma, the region has already seen the peak of the disease and the rate of daily infections has now started to level off, Indian Express reported.

The transport of livestock from the affected areas had been banned by the Gujarat government on July 27.

What is nodular skin disease?

According to the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI), lumpy skin disease is caused by capripoxvirus, which is genetically related to the goat pox and sheep pox virus families. The disease, described by GAVI as “an emerging threat to livestock worldwide”, causes fever, superficial lymph nodes and multiple nodules on the skin of livestock. The virus affects livestock through vectors such as blood-sucking insects such as ticks, mosquitoes, flies, lice and wasps. Once infected, animals begin to lose weight and have reduced milk production. They may also have excessive nasal and salivary secretion. The disease can lead to miscarriages in pregnant cows and buffaloes and also lead to the death of the animal.

Are humans in danger?

This is not the first time the disease has affected livestock in India. Two years ago, a strain of the virus causing lumpy skin disease was detected in Maharashtra. Although sporadically, Gujarat has also reported cases in recent years. However, humans cannot be infected with the virus because the disease is not zoonotic, meaning it is not transmitted from animals to humans. However, the milk produced by an infected animal must be boiled or pasteurized to kill the viruses, if present, before being consumed by humans, quoted Indian Express JB Kathiriya, assistant professor at the College of Veterinary and breeding of Kamdhenu University in Junagadh. , as they say.


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