Skip to content
Dollar slightly firmer in early trading


The dollar continues its strong form this week as higher yields and hawkish talk from the Fed support the currency.

EUR/USD fell to a one-month low at 1.0850 as downward pressure continues, with the pair looking set for a seventh straight day of declines. Sellers are targeting the March low at 1.0806 and this remains the key level to watch:

Meanwhile, GBP/USD is also down 0.4% at 1.3027 as the pair looks vulnerable to another test of the 1.3000 level. USD/JPY also remains supported as bond selling continues with 2-year Treasury yields up 4.8 basis points to 2.509%. It is to see USD/JPY

USD/JPY

USD/JPY is the currency pair comprising the United States dollar (symbol $, code USD) and the Japanese yen from Japan (symbol ¥, code JPY). The pair’s rate indicates how many Japanese yen are needed to buy one US dollar. For example, when USD/JPY is trading at 100.00, that means 1 US dollar equals 100 Japanese yen. The US Dollar (USD) is the most traded currency in the world, while the Japanese Yen is the third most traded currency in the world, resulting in an extremely liquid pair and very tight spreads, often staying within range from 0 pip to 2 pip in most markets. currency brokers. Although the USD/JPY range is not traditionally particularly high, the lack of significant price action often associated with other JPY pairs makes it easier to trade. This is especially true for short-term traders, although without offering a good pip potential. Even though USD/JPY is the second most traded pair in the world, it is not as popular as one might think when it comes to retail traders. Trading USD/JPY The JPY is highly regarded as a safe-haven currency, with investors often increasing their exposure after periods of uncertainty or market-induced fallout. The United States and Japan being highly developed economies, several key factors affect the value. of either currency. This includes a range of economic indicators such as gross domestic product (GDP) growth, inflation, interest rates and unemployment data. The monetary policy of the US Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan is also a determining factor in the value of each currency.

USD/JPY is the currency pair comprising the United States dollar (symbol $, code USD) and the Japanese yen from Japan (symbol ¥, code JPY). The pair’s rate indicates how many Japanese yen are needed to buy one US dollar. For example, when USD/JPY is trading at 100.00, that means 1 US dollar equals 100 Japanese yen. The US Dollar (USD) is the most traded currency in the world, while the Japanese Yen is the third most traded currency in the world, resulting in an extremely liquid pair and very tight spreads, often staying within range from 0 pip to 2 pip in most markets. currency brokers. Although the USD/JPY range is not traditionally particularly high, the lack of significant price action often associated with other JPY pairs makes it easier to trade. This is especially true for short-term traders, although without offering a good pip potential. Even though USD/JPY is the second most traded pair in the world, it is not as popular as one might think when it comes to retail traders. Trading USD/JPY The JPY is highly regarded as a safe-haven currency, with investors often increasing their exposure after periods of uncertainty or market-induced fallout. The United States and Japan being highly developed economies, several key factors affect the value. of either currency. This includes a range of economic indicators such as gross domestic product (GDP) growth, inflation, interest rates and unemployment data. The monetary policy of the US Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan is also a determining factor in the value of each currency.
Read this term now at 124.10 as the buyers try to hold a push above the 124.00 handle looking for a test of 125.00 again.

Elsewhere, AUD/USD is down 0.2% at 0.7462 while USD/USD

USD/USD

NZD/USD is a commonly offered currency pair representing the New Zealand Dollar or Kiwi and US Dollar. The pair is popular for exposure to a commodity currency, namely the NZD, which helps capture traders’ risk appetite. Like its Antipodean counterpart, the Australian dollar, NZD/USD is seen as carry, in part due to interest rate differentials favoring the NZD. The NZD is the seventh most liquid pair in the world at the time of writing, with the USD being the most traded currency in the world and the NZD being the tenth. What affects NZD/USD? NZD/USD is offered at virtually all retail forex brokerages and is a common pair that traders may have experience with. The pair moves based on investor sentiment and can be much more volatile than other pairs such as EUR/USD, GBP/USD and others. Given that New Zealand is the world’s largest exporter of powdered milk, this metric is a key factor when driving the pair. Any sensitivity to milk powder exports is captured via the NZD/USD. Additionally, tourism is a key contributor to the New Zealand economy and as such helps move the currency pair. Other factors of note for NZD/USD include export volumes to China as well as other important economic data releases from China. Central banks also play a huge role in the direction of the currency pair, with the US Federal Reserve and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand being closely watched by investors. Monetary policy is more than capable of sharply moving NZD/USD, which can swing much more than other normal pairs.

NZD/USD is a commonly offered currency pair representing the New Zealand Dollar or Kiwi and US Dollar. The pair is popular for exposure to a commodity currency, namely the NZD, which helps capture traders’ risk appetite. Like its Antipodean counterpart, the Australian dollar, NZD/USD is seen as carry, in part due to interest rate differentials favoring the NZD. The NZD is the seventh most liquid pair in the world at the time of writing, with the USD being the most traded currency in the world and the NZD being the tenth. What affects NZD/USD? NZD/USD is offered at virtually all retail forex brokerages and is a common pair that traders may have experience with. The pair moves based on investor sentiment and can be much more volatile than other pairs such as EUR/USD, GBP/USD and others. Given that New Zealand is the world’s largest exporter of powdered milk, this metric is a key factor when driving the pair. Any sensitivity to milk powder exports is captured via the NZD/USD. Additionally, tourism is a key contributor to the New Zealand economy and as such helps move the currency pair. Other factors of note for NZD/USD include export volumes to China as well as other important economic data releases from China. Central banks also play a huge role in the direction of the currency pair, with the US Federal Reserve and the Reserve Bank of New Zealand being closely watched by investors. Monetary policy is more than capable of sharply moving NZD/USD, which can swing much more than other normal pairs.
Read this term is down 0.4% at 0.6864 as the Aussie and Kiwi are seemingly exhausted following the post-RBA rally earlier in the week.


cnbctv18-forexlive-benzinga -Sp

Not all news on the site expresses the point of view of the site, but we transmit this news automatically and translate it through programmatic technology on the site and not from a human editor.