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Corsicans divided on whether to vote


REPORT

Corsica has been in the spotlight for a month. After the attack and the death of Yvan Colonna, the demonstrations multiplied in Bastia, Furiani, Ajaccio or Corte. They turned into riots. In this context and three days before the first round of the presidential election, the question arises: How is the election monitored on the Island of Beauty? Will the Corsicans be present on Sunday April 10?

“I will vote for Yvan Colonna!”

“We are not going to vote” declares a woman at the microphone of Europe 1. For these separatists met during demonstrations in Ajaccio and Bastia, the presidential election will take place without them: “we are perhaps French from a point from a legal point of view, but exclusively legal. I will vote for Yvan Colonna!” added another protester.

Other independence activists adopt more measured positions: “I have friends and colleagues from all sides. Nationalists from the hard fringe, others more moderate like me, and people from the right and the left. They don’t understand why I’m not going to vote. Honestly, no one could interest me in this election. I’ll see in the second round. If there’s Le Pen, I’ll think about it”, analyzes this activist who voted Mélenchon in the last presidential elections.

For Michel, who is used to voting for the autonomist party of Gilles Simeoni, Corsica has not been heard in recent years: “I will certainly not vote because I have the impression that we “Do not listen to our democracy in Corsica. If we are listened to and we listen to the people we have elected, well maybe then we will do our job as citizens”

“When it’s specific to Corsica, it’s much more motivating”

In this café in a village perched in the center of Corsica, the tone is different. “Me, I’m going to vote because it’s important to have a President of the Republic” explains a man.

“When it’s specific to Corsica, it’s much more motivating for some. The current crisis in Corsica will deter some and motivate others,” says a woman. Five years ago, Corsica was the region where the rate of abstention was the highest during the second round of the presidential election.


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