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Astros and Phillies are tied at one game apiece: NPR


Houston Astros starting pitcher Framber Valdez celebrates a double play to finish first in the sixth inning of Game 2 of the World Series between the Houston Astros and Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday. The Astros won the game, 5-2, and tied the series.

David J. Phillip/AP


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David J. Phillip/AP

Astros and Phillies are tied at one game apiece: NPR

Houston Astros starting pitcher Framber Valdez celebrates a double play to finish first in the sixth inning of Game 2 of the World Series between the Houston Astros and Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday. The Astros won the game, 5-2, and tied the series.

David J. Phillip/AP

HOUSTON — Framber Valdez traded his glove and spikes midgame. He rubbed his hands several times.

The moment he walked off the mound to a standing ovation and gave the Houston Astros bullpen a seventh-inning lead, it was clear he had thrown a curveball at the Philadelphia Phillies.

“It was a very good game for the fans, a very good game for our team and also for me,” he said through a translator after starting the Astros against the Phillies 5-2 Saturday night to tie the World Series at one game apiece. . “I just played really inspired.”

Valdez took a five-run lead after Houston’s lightning first-inning burst and Alex Bregman homered as the Astros raced to a 5-0 lead for the second straight night. Unlike ace Justin Verlander in Game 1, Valdez and Houston held on.

“His curveball was on tonight,” Phillies star Bryce Harper said after going 0 for 4. “It was big, sharp.”

Houston became the first team to open a series game with three extra base hits, and Valdez kicked the white ball in the seventh, rebounding from a pair of poor outings against Atlanta last year that left him with an ERA. of 19.29 in series.

He threw 42 curveballs on 104 pitches and had six of nine strikeouts with that pitch, including three seeking. He allowed four hits and a run in 6 2/3 innings, allowing a double in the seventh to Nick Castellanos, who scored on Jean Segura’s sacrifice against Rafael Montero.

Valdez said his hand rubbing was inconsequential.

“No one should think of it as anything the wrong way. I do it in broad daylight,” he said. “It’s all the tendencies I do. I do it throughout the game, maybe distracting the hitter a little bit from what I’m doing, like maybe looking at me, rubbing different things, and nothing on the field that I’m going to pitch. I’ve done it all season.”

Valdez started the match in a tan glove and spikes with orange and yellow trim, then switched before round two for a dark glove and dark cleats with a white stripe.

“Normally I have different peaks when I warm up and the ones I come into the game. Today I decided to start the game with the ones I warmed up in,” he said. he declares. “I had a long run there and I was like, you know what, I’m going to change everything. I’m going to change my glove, my belt, my cleats. And those are just things that we Dominicans, let’s just do a few trends here and there.”

When the Phillies put two runners for the only time against him in the sixth, Valdez knocked out Game 1 star JT Realmuto with high heat, then forced Harper to bounce a lead off the first pitch in a late-game double play. sleeve.

Phillies manager Rob Thomson didn’t take issue with Valdez rubbing his palm – social media was abuzz, wondering if there was a banned sticky substance.

“Referees check these guys after almost every inning and if something happens, MLB will deal with it,” Thomson said. “We saw him the last time he started too.”

Jose Altuve, Jeremy Peña and Yordan Alvarez all doubled as Houston took a two-point four-shot lead against Zack Wheeler. Shortstop Edmundo Sosa’s throwing error allowed another run in the first.

Astros and Phillies are tied at one game apiece: NPR

The Astros’ Jeremy Peña celebrates his RBI double in the first inning of Game 2 of the World Series between Houston and the Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday.

David J. Phillip/AP


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David J. Phillip/AP

Astros and Phillies are tied at one game apiece: NPR

The Astros’ Jeremy Peña celebrates his RBI double in the first inning of Game 2 of the World Series between Houston and the Philadelphia Phillies on Saturday.

David J. Phillip/AP

Bregman added a two-run homer in the fifth when Wheeler left a slider in the middle of the plate, Bregman’s sixth career homer in the series.

A day after coming back for a 6-5 win in 10 innings, Philadelphia also tried to rally for this one.

With the Phillies trailing by four runs, Kyle Schwarber hit a drive deep in the right field line with a man in the eighth against Montero that was originally ruled a two-run homer by the umpire of right field line James Hoye.

First base umpire Tripp Gibson signaled the umpires to the conference first and the call was reversed during a crew chief review when it was determined the ball was right on the side of the pole fault.

Schwarber, who led the NL with 46 home runs this season and added three more in the playoffs, hit the next pitch 353 feet to the right, where he was caught by Kyle Tucker just past the wall.

Ryan Pressly completed a six-hitter for a bullpen that lowered his playoff ERA to 0.89, giving up a run on which a first baseman Yuli Gurriel allowed Brandon Marsh’s ground past him and down the right field line for an error.

After the split in Houston, the series resumes Monday night when Citizens Bank Park hosts the series for the first time since 2009.

Out of 61 previous series tied 1-1, the Game 2 winner has won the title 31 times – but only four of the last 14.

“I just can’t wait to get out on Monday and keep going,” Segura said.

Altuve, who came off a 4-for-37 playoff slump with three hits, fielded a lead left on Wheeler’s first pitch and Peña tossed a curveball into the left-field corner at second for a lead 1-0. Alvarez fouled a pitch and drove a high slider up the wall 19 feet to the left.

Wheeler allowed five runs – four earned – six hits and three walks in five innings, a day after Aaron Nola struggled.

“I think everyone deserves a bad start every once in a while,” Thomson said. “These guys have been so good to us for so long, and I expect them to come back and be ready to go and throw well for us.”


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